Quote
"A student who takes part in the production of a play under really competent guidance gains a training that cannot be duplicated by any other means. It is, or should be, to him an educational experience of a high order, and no less truly educaational because it is pleasurable. His preliminary study of the character that he is to impersonate, his attempt to render that character completely in voice, action, and all the other means within his power, inevitably give him a broader and more searching knowledge of human nature - a keener sense of what is admirable and what is despicable. His imagination is quickened and developed healthily and normally. His sense of the varying values of words and of their expressivearrangement into sentences of speech is also quickened. His pronunciation of words, his articulation, and his enunciation are immensely improved (in all these the American student is notably and deplorably deficient.) His voice is also improved (the average American voice is nothing less than atrocious), and the improvement of this organ of individual expression is of the utmost value to him in society, in business, and in the development of his own personality. His use of his body and the coördination of of speech and bodily action, his bodily poise, his legitimate self-possession, all are immeasurably and beneficiently developed. Nothing can so well accomplish these very desirable results as can acting. In this light, acting becomes not a frivolous pastime, not a form of self-indulgence, not an effeminate diversion for those unable to participate in sterner activities, but an essential art, - dignified, educational, invaluable."

— Twelve One-Act Plays for Study and Production by S. Marion Tucker, Ginn & Co. 1929. (via actingschoolnotes)

Photo
theloudestvoice:

From a 1919 Photoplay magazine:
“A simple and practical scheme to give photoplay enjoyment to seriously wounded service men in several of our great base hospitals. A special type of portable projection machine has been arranged to throw its legend-laden beams vertically instead of horizontally, the ceiling acts as a very good substitute for the silver-sheet — and there you are.”

theloudestvoice:

From a 1919 Photoplay magazine:

“A simple and practical scheme to give photoplay enjoyment to seriously wounded service men in several of our great base hospitals. A special type of portable projection machine has been arranged to throw its legend-laden beams vertically instead of horizontally, the ceiling acts as a very good substitute for the silver-sheet — and there you are.”

Photo
salesonfilm:

Larry Semon as The Scarecrow in The Wizard of Oz (1925)

The original film

salesonfilm:

Larry Semon as The Scarecrow in The Wizard of Oz (1925)

The original film

(via theloudestvoice)

Photo
achyllesthewarrior:

blackhistoryalbum:

To Be Or Not To Be | 1930s on Flickr.
Via Flickr: A group of college drama students in full makeup and costume during a dress rehearsal for Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet. Howard University, Washington DC, 1930s. Addison Scurlock (1883-1964), photographer. Photo Credit: Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution Find Us On Twitter | Facebook | Tumblr

achyllesthewarrior:

blackhistoryalbum:

To Be Or Not To Be | 1930s on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
A group of college drama students in full makeup and costume during a dress rehearsal for Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet. Howard University, Washington DC, 1930s. Addison Scurlock (1883-1964), photographer.

Photo Credit: Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution

Find Us On Twitter | Facebook | Tumblr

(via theatrecollage)

Photo
chagalov:

Bronislava Nijinska in ‘Petrouchka’ (Ballets russes de Diaghilev), 1911 -Attributed to Eugène Atget[Nijinska was the first woman choregrapher in the history of dance]
from ATE

chagalov:

Bronislava Nijinska in ‘Petrouchka’ (Ballets russes de Diaghilev), 1911 -Attributed to Eugène Atget
[Nijinska was the first woman choregrapher in the history of dance]

from ATE

(via theatrecollage)

Text

The Stage Carpenter

He wanders up, he wanders down,

A phantom on the scene;

He talks to none, he does his work

With conntenance serene;

Although his purse is never fat,

'Tis like his figure - lean.

What is there he cannot construct?

An elephant to him

Is but a simple plight, or eke

A dragon fierce and grim,

And golden goblets all begemmed,

That never will grow dim.

He builds a ship, a paradise,

Where angels music speak -

Bright angels with a salary

Of just five bones a week;

And yet, in spite of genius,

His actions are so meek.

Tanks are his special workmanship,

And buzz saws meet his line;

And cottages and other things -

At these he’s very fine;

And he can make a thunder cloud,

And moons that move and shine.

But who applauds this mystic art?

The bass drum wouldn’t nod

At him, while on his daily rounds

The carpenter doth plod;

The manager? He knows him not -

A stranger in the fold.

I wonder if he ever thinks

Who cleverly will make

A little box for him some day,

That will not be a fake

When Life’s last scene on him shall close

And Heaven’s joy awake!

by Monroe H. Rosenfeld

~ The New York Clipper, November 3rd, 1894

Photo
coolchicksfromhistory:

Thamar Karsarvina (1885-1978) danced with the Imperial Russian Ballet and the Ballets Russes before becoming a ballet teacher in England.  She helped establish the Royal Ballet and the Royal Academy of Dance.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Thamar Karsarvina (1885-1978) danced with the Imperial Russian Ballet and the Ballets Russes before becoming a ballet teacher in England.  She helped establish the Royal Ballet and the Royal Academy of Dance.

Photo
The boys from the Back of the North Wind who attend Father Christmas in Oakland’s delightful and fantastic Christmas Pageant

~ Theatre Magazine, December 1920

The boys from the Back of the North Wind who attend Father Christmas in Oakland’s delightful and fantastic Christmas Pageant

~ Theatre Magazine, December 1920

Text

How They Landed Their First Part

William Collier, star of “The Hottentot,” started his stage career at the early age of eleven. He ran away from home in 1879 to land his first job.

Mr. Collier’s father and mother were both of the theatre. His father was Edmund Collier, a well-known tradegian, and his mother was Henrietta Engel, a dancer. He says that he hasn’t a relative in the world that isn’t connected with the theatre, so it was only natural that his earliest ambitions should have been toward a professional career.

When eleven years old, young Collier became restless and ran away from home to join Haverly’s Juvenile “Pinafore” company. His salary was $3.50 a week and board. There were 101 children in the company and they played for fourteen months. Collier says that during that time he had a distraction of being the only one of the children that got a raise in his salary, but that was probably because he helped with baggage.

After the close of this engagement, young Collier was taken home and sent to school until he was fifteen. His father then obtained a position him a position at Daly’s Theatre. His salary began at $7 a week. He stayed with Daly from 1883 to 1888 and was again distinguished during this perioud by getting a raise in salary to $8 a week. At first when he opened his pay envelope and found the extra $1 he thought a mistake had been made, so he decided to keep it in secret. It took several weeks for him to realize that the extra dollar was really a weekly permanent acquisition.

by Walter A. Lowenberg

~ Theatre Magazine, June 1920

Photo
The previous poem was accompanied by this photo of David Warfield in David Belasco’s new play, “The Return of Peter Grimm.”
~The Theatre, December 1911

The previous poem was accompanied by this photo of David Warfield in David Belasco’s new play, “The Return of Peter Grimm.”

~The Theatre, December 1911